'I'm always looking for the Hows and the Whys and the Whats,' said Muskrat, 'That is why I speak as I do. You've heard of Muskrat's Much-in-Little, of course?'
'No,' said the child. 'What is it?'
- The Mouse and his Child. Russell Hoban.

Go here to find out more.

Saturday, 6 June 2009

Amazing news! Meet Ida.


View the most important subject about which I have ever posted:


9 comments:

  1. Sadly in the 2 weeks or so since this video was made, Ida has been shown to be over hyped and nothing close to 'the missing link' at all.
    The reporter is now probably glad he kept using the word 'could' towards the end of his report.

    But still, a very interesting and important fossil.

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  2. Katherine,

    we're usually on the side of science, but when it comes to fossils, we always remember that furry fish over at Ripley's Believe it or Not . . . and o'course there's the story about having the wrong head on the Brontosaurus at the American Museum of natural History {for forty years!}

    but, yeah this story has GOT to be shaking things up in Dayton, Tennessee. :-)

    anyhoo, thank you once again for another interesting thingy.

    oh, btw, what are we clicking on that turns the music on? :-0

    c'ya later, Kath ;-)

    ..
    .ero

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  3. Hell that's not new Katherine, it's history!

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  4. Fascinating...is this real? I can't believe something of that significance wouldn't make it to the newspaper!

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  5. we humans are here for such a fraction of time - and how precious it is.

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  6. Hi Katherine,
    Yep, that's fantastic, awe-inspiring, truly important as you say.
    The similarities between Ida and certain archbishops (also primates) are striking.
    Rob ;)

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  7. I had seen the printed story and assumed the name was Eye-duh, but if it's Eee-duh, the Eee-duh it is from now on.

    I must admit I'm a bit skeptical of a story that includes the words "found twenty years ago and mounted on a wall as artwork by a Norwegian paleontologist"....

    Perhaps it is an ancestor of the three-toed sloth instead....

    I can't get my head around this just yet....something is rotten in the state of Denmark, er, Germany.

    And if Ida was in Germany, why was Lucy found way down in Africa?

    There are some missing links in the story itself....

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  8. Well, whether over-hyped or not, it's still very interesting!

    Artwork! LOL!

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  9. Lucy's fossil was 3.2 million years old, Ida is much older: 47 million years old. Lucy is Astralopithecus afarensis - a hominid, Ida is also a hominid, but showing characteristics of both arthropoids (Lucy and our primate subgroup) and the prosimians (which developed into the lemurs), so she confirms so much more new information that previously could only be surmised.

    At that time the continents were in quite a different shape and position and the climate also was tropical over much of the earth. There was no ice at the poles, and Olduvai Gorge and Messel Pit would have been both in a tropical rainforest environment.
    I understand there is no doubt that the fossil is genuine. There are ways of establishing that these days, and I expect that was one of the first things done.
    More information at:
    http://www.revealingthelink.com/

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