'I'm always looking for the Hows and the Whys and the Whats,' said Muskrat, 'That is why I speak as I do. You've heard of Muskrat's Much-in-Little, of course?'
'No,' said the child. 'What is it?'
- The Mouse and his Child. Russell Hoban.

Go here to find out more.

Tuesday, 27 April 2010

Meet Max


... Limax maximus, actually. And although you may not want to meet him, I was delighted to make his* acquaintance a few minutes ago when I took out the scraps to the compost heap. Along with his entourage of minute cream friends, and providing moist protection for a worm, he was resting on the underside of the compost bin lid.


Slugs in general don't interest me much, but I quite like nice big robust species like Max, and I consider his leopard spots quite delightful. He is also called the Great Grey slug or, unsurprisingly, the Leopard slug.
They have been accidentally introduced to many places other than native Europe and are now found in many countries all over the world, so Wiki tells me.

Wikki also tells me that they hang in trees when they mate, and they are the only slug species that do.

And apparently they are also good at learning new things, and have been used in experiments exploring learning behaviour.



* or her. Slugs are hermaphrodites, and have both sex organs.

16 comments:

  1. Here was me, expecting a dog or cat and what do I get? A slug. Well, I guess I really should have expected that, coming from you! I am quite taken by the really big banana slugs that we have here in the Pacific Northwest.

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  2. Oh oh! I've always wanted to meet a banana slug!

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  3. We have some really huge slugs here in Oz. I am not sure if they are the same as Max, but the slime the exude is almost impossible to remove from skin. I know this from horrible experience!

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  4. Oh yes. The Slime-Masters.

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  5. now we're confused . . :-0

    when these slugs hang from trees to mate (?) do they take turns being the the boyfriend then girlfriend, or is it more of a simultaneous thingy?

    btw, the leopard coat is fah-bulous, dahling. ;-)

    ..
    .ero
    .

    p.s. another fun post, Katherine.

    :-)

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  6. Um, each of them has ..er.. both. So yeah, it's simultaneous. But it gets complicated at the end... Google Is Your Friend.

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  7. Hmmm.

    I suppose if earthworms can be trained then slugs would be a cinch. Hmmm. I feel an idea for a post coming on.

    Have you read The Drunken Goldfish?

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  8. No I haven't. Do you recommend it? Is it to do with slimy things?

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  9. Yes. You'd love it (I'm pretty sure you would anyway). It's about 'useless' research; generally for PhD theses. If you can't get it from the library let me know and I'll bring my copy next Spring and you can borrow it. I'm confident you are a returner of books!

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  10. I'll try and find it. But I am a Very Good Returner of Things. ( Did you see the capitals GB?)

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  11. Have YOU read The Two and a Half Pillars of Wisdom?

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  12. I was sure that you would be and I did notice!

    I have The 2 1/2 Pillars of Wisdom sitting with all the other A McCall S books but it's the one I haven't read yet. It's no longer in the bookcase. It's on the coffee table. That moves it into the 'possibly this year' status.

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  13. I do not care for slimy things of any kind. Not even boiled okra. Call me crazy.

    But I enjoyed reading your post and seeing "the thing" (from a safe distance).

    I do not know why I am so squeamish, but I have no intention of paying good money to a psychiatrist to find out.

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  14. Oh no Robert, you are the normal one. I admit that. But note I didn't actually touch Max.

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  15. I used to hang in trees.

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  16. What a acerbic wit you have Sam! You get the prize for the funniest comment of the year to date. Here, have this dried apricot!

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