'I'm always looking for the Hows and the Whys and the Whats,' said Muskrat, 'That is why I speak as I do. You've heard of Muskrat's Much-in-Little, of course?'
'No,' said the child. 'What is it?'
- The Mouse and his Child. Russell Hoban.

Go here to find out more.

Saturday, 8 August 2015

Maps and Plans

Dad was a cartographer.  Perhaps then it's not surprising then that from an early age I have had a fascination for maps, plans and diagrams. I am told the first recognisable drawing I ever did was a map of our village roundabout, with all the roads coming off it.
I have quite a few books on the subjects of maps and plans, but there are at least two books I would like to own but don't yet:

1. Simon Winchester's book  The Map That Changed the World - about William 'Strata' Smith (23 March 1769 – 28 August 1839), his life, and his marvelous geological map that he painstakingly compiled from years of observation and data and fossil collection. (Darwin used it to help him formulate some of his evolutionary theory!)



2. Matteo Pericoli's (click) 26 foot long accordion book London Unfurled of drawings of the north bank of London from the Thames.
(Unfortunately it's unobtainable at the moment, but I've put my email address to be contacted.)





Here is a clip of him unrolling his sketch for us.  It was based on over 6,000 photos that he took.

8 comments:

  1. We have "The Map That Changed the World" by Winchester. It's pretty easy to get. It is only the regular size and not particularly thick. Easy reading.
    Pericoli's "London Unfurled" is rather like the ancient maps that Chinese sailors and explorers used. They used a long scroll and drew the important things and notes on that, sort of like a long horizontal blog or frieze. Go further - just add some more on the end. Miss something - cut and insert extra paper.

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    1. Louise - The Winchester IS easy to get - and I WILL! Actually I have already bought it twice, and given it away each time, and yes, one of them went to my Dad.
      The scroll book is an interesting and old idea. I might make a scroll painting one day, perhaps.

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  2. I've always been fascinated by very early maps, unfortunately I never thought to buy any. Silly me!

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    1. I love pretending to be there. I have a book of cycle routes around London. I can look at it for hours heh.

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  3. If you find early charts interesting then the Hydrographic Office print a selection of old ones.

    Early Charts

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    1. Thank you Adrian! I will check your link out. How on this Earth did you create the link, I would also like to know!

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  4. Like the globes with only part of the West coast of New Zealand (Nova Zeelandia) on it and the major part of Australia is Terra Incognita.

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    1. Yes! Ben. And 'Here Ther Bee Dragons'

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